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Are You One of the 533M People Who Got Facebooked?

Ne’er-do-wells leaked personal data — including phone numbers — for some 553 million Facebook users this week. Facebook says the data was collected before 2020 when it changed things to prevent such information from being scraped from profiles. To my mind, this just reinforces the need to remove mobile phone numbers from all of your online accounts wherever feasible. Meanwhile, if you’re a Facebook product user and want to learn if your data was leaked, there are easy ways to find out.

The HaveIBeenPwned project, which collects and analyzes hundreds of database dumps containing information about billions of leaked accounts, has incorporated the data into his service. Facebook users can enter the mobile number (in international format) associated with their account and see if those digits were exposed in the new data dump (HIBP doesn’t show you any data, just gives you a yes/no on whether your data shows up).

The phone number associated with my late Facebook account (which I deleted in Jan. 2020) was not in HaveIBeenPwned, but then again Facebook claims to have more than 2.7 billion active monthly users.

It appears much of this database has been kicking around the cybercrime underground in one form or another since last summer at least. According to a Jan. 14, 2021 Twitter post from Under the Breach’s Alon Gal, the 533 million Facebook accounts database was first put up for sale back in June 2020, offering Facebook profile data from 100 countries, including name, mobile number, gender, occupation, city, country, and marital status.

Under The Breach also said back in January that someone had created a Telegram bot allowing users to query the database for a low fee, and enabling people to find the phone numbers linked to a large number of Facebook accounts.

A cybercrime forum ad from June 2020 selling a database of 533 Million Facebook users. Image: @UnderTheBreach

Many people may not consider their mobile phone number to be private information, but there is a world of misery that bad guys, stalkers and creeps can visit on your life just by knowing your mobile number. Sure they could call you and harass you that way, but more likely they will see how many of your other accounts — at major email providers and social networking sites like Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, e.g. — rely on that number for password resets.

From there, the target is primed for a SIM-swapping attack, where thieves trick or bribe employees at mobile phone stores into transferring ownership of the target’s phone number to a mobile device controlled by the attackers. From there, the bad guys can reset the password of any account to which that mobile number is tied, and of course intercept any one-time tokens sent to that number for the purposes of multi-factor authentication.

Or the attackers take advantage of some other privacy and security wrinkle in the way SMS text messages are handled. Last month, a security researcher showed how easy it was to abuse services aimed at helping celebrities manage their social media profiles to intercept SMS messages for any mobile user. That weakness has supposedly been patched for all the major wireless carriers now, but it really makes you question the ongoing sanity of relying on the Internet equivalent of postcards (SMS) to securely handle quite sensitive information.

My advice has long been to remove phone numbers from your online accounts wherever you can, and avoid selecting SMS or phone calls for second factor or one-time codes. Phone numbers were never designed to be identity documents, but that’s effectively what they’ve become. It’s time we stopped letting everyone treat them that way.

Any online accounts that you value should be secured with a unique and strong password, as well as the most robust form of multi-factor authentication available. Usually, this is a mobile app like Authy or Google Authenticator that generates a one-time code. Some sites like Twitter and Facebook now support even more robust options — such as physical security keys.

Removing your phone number may be even more important for any email accounts you may have. Sign up with any service online, and it will almost certainly require you to supply an email address. In nearly all cases, the person who is in control of that address can reset the password of any associated services or accounts– merely by requesting a password reset email.

Unfortunately, many email providers still let users reset their account passwords by having a link sent via text to the phone number on file for the account. So remove the phone number as a backup for your email account, and ensure a more robust second factor is selected for all available account recovery options.

Here’s the thing: Most online services require users to supply a mobile phone number when setting up the account, but do not require the number to remain associated with the account after it is established. I advise readers to remove their phone numbers from accounts wherever possible, and to take advantage of a mobile app to generate any one-time codes for multifactor authentication.

Why did KrebsOnSecurity delete its Facebook account early last year? Sure, it might have had something to do with the incessant stream of breaches, leaks and privacy betrayals by Facebook over the years. But what really bothered me were the number of people who felt comfortable sharing extraordinarily sensitive information with me on things like Facebook Messenger, all the while expecting that I can vouch for the privacy and security of that message just by virtue of my presence on the platform.

In case readers want to get in touch for any reason, my email here is krebsonsecurity at gmail dot com, or krebsonsecurity at protonmail.com. I also respond at Krebswickr on the encrypted messaging platform Wickr.

Source: KREBS ON SECURITY

Ransom Gangs Emailing Victim Customers for Leverage

Some of the top ransomware gangs are deploying a new pressure tactic to push more victim organizations into paying an extortion demand: Emailing the victim’s customers and partners directly, warning that their data will be leaked to the dark web unless they can convince the victim firm to pay up.

This letter is from the Clop ransomware gang, putting pressure on a recent victim named on Clop’s dark web shaming site.

“Good day! If you received this letter, you are a customer, buyer, partner or employee of [victim],” the missive reads. “The company has been hacked, data has been stolen and will soon be released as the company refuses to protect its peoples’ data.”

“We inform you that information about you will be published on the darknet [link to dark web victim shaming page] if the company does not contact us,” the message concludes. “Call or write to this store and ask to protect your privacy!!!!”

The message above was sent to a customer of RaceTrac Petroleum, an Atlanta company that operates more than 650 retail gasoline convenience stores in 12 southeastern states. The person who shared that screenshot above isn’t a distributor or partner of RaceTrac, but they said they are a RaceTrac rewards member, so the company definitely has their email address and other information.

Several gigabytes of the company’s files — including employee tax and financial records — have been posted to the victim shaming site for the Clop ransomware gang.

In response to questions from KrebsOnSecurity, RaceTrac said it was recently impacted by a security incident affecting one of its third-party service providers, Accellion Inc.

For the past few months, attackers have been exploiting a a zero-day vulnerability in Accellion File Transfer Appliance (FTA) software, a flaw that has been seized upon by Clop to break into dozens of other major companies like oil giant Shell and security firm Qualys.

“By exploiting a previously undetected software vulnerability, unauthorized parties were able to access a subset of RaceTrac data stored in the Accellion File Transfer Service, including email addresses and first names of some of our RaceTrac Rewards Loyalty users,” the company wrote. “This incident was limited to the aforementioned Accellion services and did not impact RaceTrac’s corporate network. The systems used for processing guest credit, debit and RaceTrac Rewards transactions were not impacted.”

The same extortion pressure email has been going out to people associated with the University of California, which was one of several large U.S. universities that got hit with Clop ransomware recently. Most of those university ransomware incidents appeared to be tied to attacks on attacks on the same Accellion vulnerability, and the company has acknowledged roughly a third of its customers on that appliance got compromised as a result.

Clop is one of several ransom gangs that will demand two ransoms: One for a digital key needed to unlock computers and data from file encryption, and a second to avoid having stolen data published or sold online. That means even victims who opt not to pay to get their files and servers back still have to decide whether to pay the second ransom to protect the privacy of their customers.

As I noted in Why Paying to Delete Stolen Data is Bonkers, leaving aside the notion that victims might have any real expectation the attackers will actually destroy the stolen data, new research suggests a fair number of victims who do pay up may see some or all of the stolen data published anyway.

The email in the screenshot above differs slightly from those covered last week by Bleeping Computer, which was the first to spot the new victim notification wrinkle. Those emails say that the recipient is being contacted as they are a customer of the store, and their personal data, including phone numbers, email addresses, and credit card information, will soon be published if the store does not pay a ransom, writes Lawrence Abrams.

“Perhaps you bought something there and left your personal data. Such as phone, email, address, credit card information and social security number,” the Clop gang states in the email.

Fabian Wosar, chief technology officer at computer security firm Emsisoft, said the direct appeals to victim customers is a natural extension of other advertising efforts by the ransomware gangs, which recently included using hacked Facebook accounts to post victim shaming advertisements.

Wosar said Clop isn’t the only ransomware gang emailing victim customers.

“Clop likes to do it and I think REvil started as well,” Wosar said.

Earlier this month, Bleeping Computer reported that the REvil ransomware operation was planning on launching crippling distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks against victims, or making VOIP calls to victims’ customers to apply further pressure.

“Sadly, regardless of whether a ransom is paid, consumers whose data has been stolen are still at risk as there is no way of knowing if ransomware gangs delete the data as they promise,” Abrams wrote.

Source: KREBS ON SECURITY